This is a Godless place.

atheism for the win.

2,746 notes

sagansense:

Are you planning on watching some movies tonight on Netflix? Or posting a photo to Tumblr? Or backing a crowdfunded project? You’re going to see a lot of spinning wheels. As fall elections heat up and the FCC prepares to close the public comment period on its Open Internet proposal, a cluster of major sites and a number of more minor ones are urging visitors to contact Congress and the FCC and express support for reclassifying broadband internet under the “common carrier” rules that govern phone service and other utilities. This isn’t the only net neutrality-related proposal on the table, but it’s one that could successfully block internet service providers from providing “fast lanes” to sites that pay more, something FCC chair Tom Wheeler has considered allowing within “commercially reasonable” bounds.

Supporters of that proposal argue that ISPs won’t be able to degrade overall quality but can experiment with new tiers of service and business models. To people taking part in the day of action, though, speeding some services up could automatically relegate other parts of the internet to a “slow lane” where ISPs have less incentive to improve quality. And if the new net neutrality rules can’t survive a legal challenge (as the last set couldn’t), they could theoretically even degrade quality of service. Hence today’s protest — if the web gets more data-intensive but internet quality is no longer evenly distributed, the idea goes, you could be seeing a lot more buffering.

The widgets used by some of the sites come from net neutrality coalition Battle for the Net. Some ask you to sign a petition or send an email, while others will let you enter your phone number and directly connect you with a representative from your district, if you’re in the US. The FCC is responsible for finalizing a net neutrality framework, but Congress can show support and potentially float legislation in support of the agency. House minority leader Nancy Pelosi (D-CA), for instance, has officially come out in favor of reclassifying broadband under common carrier rules.

No matter what you do, these banners will be popping up until midnight tonight, when the day of action ends.

— Adi Robertson  | The Verge

sagansense:

Are you planning on watching some movies tonight on Netflix? Or posting a photo to Tumblr? Or backing a crowdfunded project? You’re going to see a lot of spinning wheels. As fall elections heat up and the FCC prepares to close the public comment period on its Open Internet proposal, a cluster of major sites and a number of more minor ones are urging visitors to contact Congress and the FCC and express support for reclassifying broadband internet under the “common carrier” rules that govern phone service and other utilities. This isn’t the only net neutrality-related proposal on the table, but it’s one that could successfully block internet service providers from providing “fast lanes” to sites that pay more, something FCC chair Tom Wheeler has considered allowing within “commercially reasonable” bounds.

Supporters of that proposal argue that ISPs won’t be able to degrade overall quality but can experiment with new tiers of service and business models. To people taking part in the day of action, though, speeding some services up could automatically relegate other parts of the internet to a “slow lane” where ISPs have less incentive to improve quality. And if the new net neutrality rules can’t survive a legal challenge (as the last set couldn’t), they could theoretically even degrade quality of service. Hence today’s protest — if the web gets more data-intensive but internet quality is no longer evenly distributed, the idea goes, you could be seeing a lot more buffering.

The widgets used by some of the sites come from net neutrality coalition Battle for the Net. Some ask you to sign a petition or send an email, while others will let you enter your phone number and directly connect you with a representative from your district, if you’re in the US. The FCC is responsible for finalizing a net neutrality framework, but Congress can show support and potentially float legislation in support of the agency. House minority leader Nancy Pelosi (D-CA), for instance, has officially come out in favor of reclassifying broadband under common carrier rules.

No matter what you do, these banners will be popping up until midnight tonight, when the day of action ends.

Adi Robertson | The Verge

180,536 notes

staff:

Today’s the day. The day you help save the internet from being ruined.

Ready? 

Yes, you are, and we’re ready to help you.

(Long story short: The FCC is about to make a critical decision as to whether or not internet service providers have to treat all traffic equally. If they choose wrong, then the internet where anyone can start a website for any reason at all, the internet that’s been so momentous, funny, weird, and surprising—that internet could cease to exist. Here’s your chance to preserve a beautiful thing.)

3 notes

Anonymous asked: This is amazing your views on religion really closely border mine, but I identify as agnostic. Can you explain the difference between atheism and agnosticism?

Atheism to me is having no belief in a god or gods, some people would take it a step further and have no belief in anything superstitious or supernatural. While agnosticism (in the way you’ve used it) is not having an opinion one way or the other about believing. Or just being completely undecided.

And thank you for you question! Feel free to message me again if you have any other concerns!

-Victor

Filed under victor Anonymous

76 notes

confrontingbabble-on:

Religion divides society…into those who are ready, willing and able…to turn a blind eye to the immorality and bigotry, openly enshrined within its religious literature, practices, and history…in exchange for a sense of belonging to a group of similar avoiders…and, those who can just not stomach such abhorrent practices and attitudes…

confrontingbabble-on:

Religion divides society…into those who are ready, willing and able…to turn a blind eye to the immorality and bigotry, openly enshrined within its religious literature, practices, and history…in exchange for a sense of belonging to a group of similar avoiders…and, those who can just not stomach such abhorrent practices and attitudes…

14 notes

Kevin Sorbo continues to make the rounds of Religious Right radio programs to promote the the DVD release of his recent film “God’s Not Dead.” While appearing on Jerry Newcombe’s “Vocal Point” radio program recently, Sorbo noted that Mel Gibson had created a lot more opportunities for Christian filmmakers in Hollywood with the success of his film “The Passion of the Christ,” which made a lot of money despite concerns from Jewish leaders that the film was anti-Semitic.

Sorbo, for his part, does not really understand what Jews were so upset about.

"He got attacked when he was shooting ‘The Passion’ from the Jewish community, saying ‘look at the way you’re portraying us,’" Sorbo said. "News bulletin: you did kill Jesus!"

Newcombe immediately attempted to rein in Sorbo’s statement, saying that the Jews actually just “delivered him over to the Romans,” to which Sorbo replied that the Jews still “had a hand in it” before noting that, despite their concerns, the film went on to earn hundreds of millions of dollars “so Mel sort of had the last laugh, there…”

Kevin Sorbo’s Message To Jews: ‘News Bulletin: You Did Kill Jesus’ (via smdxn)