This is a Godless place.

atheism for the win.

27 notes

So something happened while at work last night..

(I should preface this by saying my manager is my uncle, who knows i’m an atheist and he’s a hardcore christian.:p)

It was a conversation between my manager, two cowokers, and myself while we were on a break. I’m the only atheist between us by the way. My manager brought up a misconception that Obama is “doing whatever he can to gives Muslims more freedom in america.” 

I looked at him and said, “what’s your source on this information?”

He mentions that it was something he saw on facebook, to which i noted that he should be wary of propaganda that has no real facts. Especially on social media.

But i went on to say, “even if it weren’t true, why shouldn’t muslims have more freedom in america? They should be treated the same as every other religion, especially Christianity.”

My uncle responds with, “Well why should we when ISIS is beheading all these americans and other christians in the middle east?”

This is when i dropped the bomb on him. I went on a bit of a rant here haha.

I said, “what you need to remember is that ISIS is a very small extremist faction of muslims. They are no different than the Ku Klux Klan in America. What would you say if I held the belief that all Christians need to be restricted in freedoms in this country based on the actions of a few? Don’t you think that’s an unfair representation of your religion?”

My uncle didn’t have a response. He just sort of stared at me while thinking, then slowly nodded.

Hopefully i opened his eyes a little bit to the intolerance that he was unintentionally spreading.

Just thought i’d share a little story, seeing as i don’t blog nearly as much as i’d like to anymore. :p

-Victor

Filed under atheist atheism agnostic religion christianity islam isis victor

148 notes

Religion, no matter the geographical shade or cultural flavor, is a psychological fabrication of our ignorance; a byproduct of the place and time amidst the history of the human race.

None of the religions created throughout history - passed off as substitute truths of their time - ever factored in what would happen if we actually could reach closer to an (f)actual understanding of the laws of nature through subjecting the underpinnings of reality to our most rigorous of experiments and tests.

Essentially, religion is bolstered by ignorance and a willingness to bypass actual education for a socially accepted psychosis. However, ignorance cannot remain stagnant. The only constant is change. And to instigate change, skepticism must be practiced. Critical thinking must be taught. Curiosity must flourish. Exploration of the unknown must remain persistent.

Organized religions of power and influence today are experiencing the blowback of a society yearning for truth from sources actually proficient in the matters being passively discussed and placed away in the hands of an enigmatic deity.

Analogous to a black hole steadily unweaving the mass of a star within its reach, religion is becoming stripped of its illustrious dominance. This dance will slowly continue until our society pushes beyond the frontiers of its staple traditions, established not-so-long-ago with a directive based around uniformity and control.

The new systems of teaching, education, and communication are seemingly chaotic and experimental; however, we are amidst a well deserved overhaul. The transitions we are moving toward have become just as organic and specialized as the natural world we seek to understand.

R. Evans (Sagan Sense)

(Source: sagansense)

1,998 notes

As an atheist, I see nothing ‘wrong’ in believing in a God. I don’t think there is a God, but belief in him does no harm. If it helps you in any way, then that’s fine with me. It’s when belief starts infringing on other people’s rights when it worries me. I would never deny your right to believe in a God. I would just rather you didn’t kill people who believe in a different God, say. Or stone someone to death because your rulebook says their sexuality is immoral. It’s strange that anyone who believes that an all-powerful all-knowing, omniscient power responsible for everything that happens, would also want to judge and punish people for what they are.
Ricky Gervais (via the-otp-gay-off)

(Source: nevermindtheb0ll0cks, via victoriavarone)

9 notes

smdxn:

Left Behind Is Biblical in Its Silliness

“What is this fucking music?” is the very first thing I wrote in my notebook while watching Left Behind. Two pages later, I wrote again, “No, seriously, what is this fucking music?” Indiscriminately scored to what appears to be the soundtrack from an ’80s infomercial, and directed with all the nuance that suggests, the early scenes of Left Behind quickly cement its place in the Bad Movie Hall of Fame. But it’s the later scenes, when the plot becomes thoroughly unhinged, that the movie enters another plane altogether. Adapted from Tim LaHaye and Jerry B. Jenkins’s best-selling evangelical novels about the end times, Left Behind is biblical in its silliness.

See also, "Disaster Movie? We Round Up the Most Scathing ‘Left Behind’ Reviews."

smdxn:

Left Behind Is Biblical in Its Silliness

“What is this fucking music?” is the very first thing I wrote in my notebook while watching Left Behind. Two pages later, I wrote again, “No, seriously, what is this fucking music?” Indiscriminately scored to what appears to be the soundtrack from an ’80s infomercial, and directed with all the nuance that suggests, the early scenes of Left Behind quickly cement its place in the Bad Movie Hall of Fame. But it’s the later scenes, when the plot becomes thoroughly unhinged, that the movie enters another plane altogether. Adapted from Tim LaHaye and Jerry B. Jenkins’s best-selling evangelical novels about the end times, Left Behind is biblical in its silliness.

See also, "Disaster Movie? We Round Up the Most Scathing ‘Left Behind’ Reviews."

9 notes

smdxn:

Jefferson would be repulsed by Justice Scalia — and Cenk [Uygar] explains it perfectly

Uygur specifically cited Thomas Jefferson’s writing in Article 11 of the Treaty of Tripoli of 1797.

“As the government of the United States of America is not in any sense founded on the Christian Religion; as it has in itself no character of enmity against the laws, religion or tranquility of [Muslims]; and as the said States never have entered into any war or act of hostility against any Mehomitan nation, it is declared by the parties that no pretext arising from religious opinions shall ever produce an interruption of the harmony existing between the two countries,” Jefferson stated in the treaty.

On Wednesday, Scalia told an audience at Colorado Christian University that conservatives’ primary fight was “to dissuade Americans from what the secularists are trying to persuade them to be true: that the separation of church and state means that the government cannot favor religion over non-religion.”

But Uygur countered with remarks from Jefferson’s 1808 letter to Virginia Baptists, in which Jefferson asserted that “religious belief, or non-belief” was an important part of every American’s life.